Five Thoughts on Questions

Apparently the keys to a good story are Who, What, Where, When, Why and How. My thoughts this week are not so much how to construct a story but how to have a few thoughts about yourself.

1. Who? This can be answered in so many ways from the prosaic I am Gordon O’Neill to the metaphysical I am a child of my time. Actually I am not sure I am but you get my drift. Spending a few moments thinking about who you are is not a bad thing. You are probably many different things and maybe not even the person you want to be. Getting to “who” you are means ditching a few misconceptions about who others think you. You probably won’t arrive at a definite answer but you might have a clearer idea.
2. What?  When someone asks you what you what you do they asking for your occupation or your trade. That’s OK except people often judge you on what you do. I am a film maker but it is not the only thing I do. What I do is more than my occupation but it is easy to fall into the trap of believing that is all you are. It’s not you do so much more.
3. Where? We all occupy a physical space and there is nothing wrong with asking if you are in the right space. That could be where you live or work or play. Sometimes we are where we are because of habit and sometimes we need to shake ourselves out of a habit or commit to a change of space.
4. Why? Why are you doing what you are currently doing?  A questioning nature is not a fault. To blindly go along without any questions is the real fault.
5. How?  I make lists, all kind of lists. I write down my daily, weekly and yearly goals. What I have learnt recently is that I need to write detailed steps of how I am going to achieve those goals. What’s more I review them every day and revise them often. If I want to achieve something I need a plan, a how, I am going to achieve it.
As this is five thoughts for Thursday I have only have room for five of the six questions. Except to say “When are you going to ask the questions and do something with the answers?”
@gordon4video
#FTFT

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Five Thoughts on Thinking

It seems strange that I have been doing Five Thoughts for several months now and this the first time it has crossed my mind to do five thoughts on thinking.  As with most of these blogs my thought process was triggered by something I read. My current morning reading of choice is Dave Trott’s One Plus One Equals Three.

If you have read any of Dave’s Trott’s books you will know that he is both thought provoking and entertaining. Half way down a page something he wrote had me reaching for my notebook and make these five observations about thinking.
  1. There is a difference between thinking and daydreaming. Daydreaming, that moment when you let your mind just drift. You are not really thinking, you probably can’t even remember what crossed your mind, if anything. Daydreaming is an aimless activity, nothing wrong with that but it’s not thinking. Thinking has a certain creative and critical element to it and, to my mind at least, it leads somewhere.
  1. “It’s the thought that counts.” I have no doubt you’ve heard that expression actually you’ve probably said it. Normally it’s said when you are given a totally inappropriate gift but you are grateful that at least they thought of you. Not very well obviously for such a crap present. Thinking has to be more than just a fleeting recognition. Thinking must surely lead to doing and some form of doing that makes a difference.
  1. Thinking has surely got to be positive and not negative. The problem with thinking, well over thinking really, is that it can quickly turn to negativity. You think about all the reasons  why something can’t be done. Sometimes just going ahead without over thinking something is the way to go. I am not advocating recklessness but sometimes you just need to think on your feet, solve the problems as you encounter them not as your think about them.
  1. Do less thinking. I have read so many top class performers, actors, athletes, artists etc talk about how they feel at their best when they just do stuff without thinking. When they over think something it all seems to go wrong. Of course they are not making it up as they go along, far from it. That level of achieving without thinking comes from hours and hours of practice and dedication but in that moment of high achievement everything comes naturally. It just flows without conscious thought. What a place to be. If you think you could never reach that level  just remember you probably drive your car without much thought. Not carelessly, it just becomes second nature, natural like breathing.
  1. Think differently. The way we think is probably the result of years of practice. We all get into a certain way of thinking about the world and the way it works. As human beings we like routine. There is safety in routine and I have no doubt we develop thought patterns along the same lines. We think a certain way because that is the way we have always thought. We have always thought that way because we have been taught and have learnt that is the way to think. Maybe we need to UNTHINK. To find another way of thinking. Not sure how you do that but it’s a thought, isn’t it?
The passage from Dave Trott’s book is on age 71 – When Thinking gets in the way
@gordon4video
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Five Thoughts For Thursday about Creativity

On most of my online biographies you will see me described as a “creative”. There are, of course, those who would say creative is a verb and not a noun. You can be creative, you can be a creative. I describe myself as a creative because I create in video form. I pursue a life of creativity, which sounds unbelievably pompous. I did though begin to think about what it means to be creative and what does it mean when people ask you to “surprise us, be creative”.
  1. Creative Carte Blanch. When a client gives you an open brief and asks you to be creative and surprise almost certainly that is not what they want you to do. Go ahead, create something completely out of left field and see their reaction. It probably won’t be the one you were hoping for. Coming up with something completely new does not mean abandoning their, no doubt hard won, brand recognition. It’s about being creative within what is already known and exists.
  2. Creativity is not plucked out of thin air. No doubt somebody somewhere has been hit with the metaphorical lightening bolt of inspiration. Coming up with an idea that has truly never been done before. I think that scenario is as rare as hens teeth. People who are really creative are those who are immersed in creativity in general and the creativity of their chosen discipline in particular. If you want to be a good writer you must read, to be a good film maker you need to watch the masters of the art at work. No creativity takes place in or emerges from a vacuum.
  3. One person’s creativity is another shrug of the shoulders. True, there are some objective criteria on which something could be judged but generally we respond subjectively. “Do I like it” or in the words of ex England manager Graham Taylor, “Do I not like that.” If some people do like your effort or indeed hate it, it does not mean what you have created is without merit. Just not to them at that moment.
  4. No one has a monopoly on creativity. I describe myself as a creative but there are people for whom creative is a job title. “I’m the chief creative at XYZ Agency”.  Having a creative does not mean other people can’t be creative because they can. There are some people who would be quick to say they haven’t a creative bone in their body.  It might not be their prime skill but they can still have creative thoughts. People say they could never write a book because they have no imagination. Yet millions of people every week construct an elaborate story of wealth, super cars, large houses and holidays every week. Only to see it dashed as soon as they checked heir lottery ticket.
  5. Creativity is never easy. Brilliant ideas emerge from the battlefield of creative hit and miss.
@gordon4video
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Is Barbie really a role model?

Yesterday I sat in a room with other creatives and watched s series of videos. The purpose was to share our thoughts and discuss best practice. I hope to share some of the others eventually. However this was the one the provoked the most discussion. This video has had almost 21 million views. Has it changed the way people feel about gender specific toys. Dolls for girls building kits for boys. I would genuinely love to read your thoughts so please leave a comment. But first watch this;

 

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Five thoughts on beating the creative roadblock

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I think just about every profession goes through a creative block at some time or other.  That feeling when you don’t seem to be able to do anything.

Often called writer’s block but it affects artists of all kinds, indeed anyone who is trying to create something. It might be a book or a blog, a painting or a sculpture, a new concept or a different way of working. All of us in one way or another have reached that point when no matter what we do the page, canvas, notebook or screen remains stubbornly empty.  So here are my five five thoughts.

  1. Keep a storeroom. Always seek inspiration from others. Reading, watching, listening and recording are, in my opinion, essential to creativity.  Keep a notebook, scrapbook or online gallery of things that have inspired you or made you think or you just liked. When barren times come wandering around this storeroom will, I promise, spark your creativity. You will find stuff you had long forgotten, dusty and neglected that will trigger new thinking. If you are not already doing this start today, it may be a while before you see the benefit but it will help. This blog would not have been written without visiting my storeroom.
  2. Try a bit of demolition. Any task can seem daunting and overwhelming. Being overwhelmed is not good for the creative juices. So break the project down. Find elements you can do right away. Start with small bricks and soon you will have a wall and eventually a temple. I might have pushed that metaphor a touch to far but you get the idea. War and Peace starts with one word, then one sentence.
  3. Get on with it. Work anyway. What stifles most creativity is the screwing up of paper and throwing it in the bin. Whether metaphorically or in reality. Get some stuff done, it might be utter rubbish but you will have done something and once you get over that hurdle you’ll be surprised how ideas start to flow. Keep everything and then come back to it. It might be days, weeks or even years later. Some of it will still be crap but there will be others things you find are actually little gems.
  4. Listen to music. The theologian Karl Barth said he did his best work to Mozart. Music can lift the spirits, get the blood pumping and inspire you. Play something that lifts your spirit and if you can play it loudly.
  5. Realise great work comes from great struggle. There are times when things just flow. You can barely keep up with the creativity coursing through your brain. Hey, savour the good times but don’t beat yourself up when it doesn’t come quite so easily. Sometimes it is the struggle that makes it all worthwhile.

Gordon O’Neill

@gordon4video

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